Book Announcements, Picture Book Journey

New Book in 2022!

I’m delighted to announce that my next picture book, Sprinkles to the Rescue, will be released in 2022 by Hurn Publications. Please keep an eye open for future updates about artwork, cover reveals, etc. I hope to have more info to share with you in the coming months!

In the meantime, I’ve been working on young adult fiction as well as picture books. I don’t know if any of this work is going to make it to print, but writing these stories has been a LOT of fun. As much as I love picture books, I’ve also really enjoyed the longer scope of a novel. For me, the most fun stage of writing is creating the first draft, and writing a longer book means more time spent on drafting. 😉

I’m in good company: many picture book writers also write in other genres, such as chapter books or middle grade. I’m looking forward to continuing to experiment with writing for different age groups.

Book Announcements, Picture Book Journey

SPOOKY wins an Award!

I’m pleased to announce that my picture book, Spooky and the Gargoyle, is one of the ategories in the 2020 Indie Reader Discovery Awards! This doesn’t mean instant fame and fortune for me (alas), but it is nice to see “Spooky” getting a little recognition. I’m very proud of that book, though I have to admit I didn’t really know what I was doing when I published it!

Take a look at all the winners. It’s exciting to see all the different kinds of books that the judges selected.

Book Announcements, Picture Book Journey

It’s Alive! It’s Alive!

It’s almost October, so what better time than now to announce the publication of my first picture book, Spooky and the Gargoyle? It’s available on Amazon in kindle (including Kindle Unlimited), paperback, and hardcover. The hardcover can also be purchased from Target.com, Barnes and Noble.com, and other online sellers– so if you’d rather not support Amazon, you do have other options.

This is the perfect season for enjoying a slightly spooky but very sweet friendship tale. If you do read it, I’d love it if you left a review!

And before I go, let me give you a head’s up about what you’ll see on this blog in the coming month. I hope to do some posts about revision, because that’s what I have been working on right now. And there may very well be a 2019 Halloweensie story for you to read.

Hope your autumn is off to a great start!

Book Announcements, Picture Book Journey

Something SPOOKY this way comes!

If you’ve visited this site before, you may notice that I’ve changed the color scheme . . . and I have a new logo. What’s Thousand Acre Wood Books, you wonder? It’s the name of my writing business, and the name under which I’m going to self-publish one of my picture book manuscripts!

This particular manuscript is near and dear to me. I wrote the earliest version back in 2016, when I had no clue what I was doing. In 2017, it was the first manuscript that I shared with other writers for a critique, and wow, did I learn a lot about what I didn’t know about writing picture books!

The story has changed a lot since 2016. The current version is quite different from what I originally imagined, but it has the same aesthetic and the same lovable characters as that flawed draft. Now, it reads like a picture book rather than a short story. I’m excited to launch this book this fall.

Why not traditionally publish? Have I given up on that route? No, I haven’t given up: I’m still hoping to traditionally publish picture books, and I’m still seeking representation. But after querying agents with this manuscript quite a bit, I’m at a point where I really ought to set it aside. And I’m too attached to do that. So I’m launching it myself, largely because I want to have this beloved book in hand to read to my children while they are still young enough to enjoy it. Plus, it’s going to be fun. 🙂

You may be wondering what the story is about and what the title is. But you’ll just have to wait for a cover reveal. Mwa ha ha!

Picture Book Journey

Make Pitching Playful

I have a confession to make: I like writing pitches. It’s fun. And I like to think that I’m good at it (though I don’t have any concrete support for that claim!).

If you already are a pro at writing short pitches that you can use for Twitter pitch parties or in-person pitch fests, you can maybe skip this post. If you don’t know why you need a short pitch, do a little reading first.

If, on the other hand, you know what a pitch is and why you need it, but feel like you are terrible at it, I have a suggestion for you. Get ready to . . . <drumroll, crescendo> play a board game!

Specifically, see if you can track down Balderdash. You’ll need the version that includes the movies category. In that category, you are given the title of a movie and you have to construct a one sentence description of it. Your challenge is to make it sound just wacky enough to be a believable real-life weird movie. You’ll do better at the game if you can imitate the language and structure of a traditional movie logline. And the practice you get from making up those loglines, I think, can help prepare you for pitching.

Don’t want to play an actual board game? You can still make pitching a game. If you don’t know what good pitches look like, I urge you to prowl through the #pitmad pitches on Twitter. See which pitches get lots of hearts or lots of forwards. What makes pitches work? Ask yourself which pitches make YOU want to read the book, and why.

Then practice. Try to “pitch” your favorite classic works of literature as if they were popular works in your preferred genre. Or, make it more fun and try to pitch classic works of literature as if they were in a DIFFERENT genre. What if you pitch GREAT EXPECTATIONS as a thriller rather than a bildungsroman? Or what if you pitch STAR WARS: RETURN OF THE JEDI as if it were primarily a romance, with Leia and Han as the main characters? This could get really fun, I promise. And if you play it was a game in a group, it’s a great way to build community . . . which is important for writers, as I’ve written about in the past.

If you want more serious practice, try helping other writers write THEIR pitches. This will give you practice in taking a title and concept and making them compelling. You will grow stronger yourself while helping another writer. It’s a win-win! So, why not play?